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Posts Tagged ‘Manchester Institute of Innovation Research’

2018 Course on The ART of Foresight & Sustainable Futures

February 27, 2018 Leave a comment

Interested in shaping the future? Join our 5-day course (2-6 July) on ‘The ART of Foresight & Sustainable Futures’ in the Manchester Institute of Innovation Research (MIOIR). Since 2018 the course runs in partnership with VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, a leading global research & technology development organization.

  • To download the 2018 course brochure, please click here
  • To visit the webpage of the 2018 course, please click here

Anticipating, Recommending and Transforming Research and Innovation Futures

The world is experiencing great uncertainties about the unfolding economic crisis and its aftershocks. Many countries, industries and public services face challenging futures where the quest for opportunities is increasingly competitive. Economic discontent has combined with existing political stresses to catch many institutions – and countries – wrong-footed. Meanwhile, globalisation, migration, environmental, political and technological trends are reshaping the rules of the game. This calls for critical reflections on existing assumptions, plans and strategies for the long-term future. Our foresight course explores ways in which decision-makers can address uncertainties. How to produce sound and forward looking results that are useful for decision-makers?

The Manchester Institute of Innovation Research has been running an annual foresight training course since 1999. Building on over twenty years of foresight experience, we are able to call upon a wealth of expertise, from staff with know-how of the practice of foresight, as well as from sponsors and practitioners. The course now runs in partnership with VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, a leading global research and technology development organisation. Future-oriented innovation policy research is a key focus for VTT, supported by the Centre’s competencies in qualitative and quantitative methods.

Course staff and invited experts/speakers

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Torino Process Expert Roundtable On Policy Evaluation

February 25, 2018 Leave a comment
VTT-Strategic-and-Sound-Evaluation_1000px_final

Relevant policy assessment and evaluation frameworks

The European Training Foundation (ETF) has initiated a reflection on how the Torino Process (TRP) can be used to introduce and promote an evaluation dimension in the exercise.  

To that end, on February 26th an expert roundtable has been organised in Torino (Italy) to share knowledge and practices in the area of policy evaluation, and discuss their applicability in line with the specificities of the TRP and its partner countries.

The expert meeting aims to provide an opportunity to get acquainted with selected aspects of the TRP, and benefit from the knowledge and advice of renowned experts in evaluation concerning key questions, such as whether evaluation could add value to the TRP and if yes, how.

The outcomes of the meeting will inform the preparation of the next cycle of the TRP and help to adjust accordingly the framework and modalities of TRP implementation.

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The Torino Process

The Torino expert meeting offers an excellent opportunity to share lessons learned from state-of-the-art evaluation experiences, such as the twelve (12) key performance indicators (KPIs) considered in VTT’s Strategic and Sound Evaluation Approach (see Hiltunen et al., 2017/forthcoming), the four (4) dimensions and ten (10) key aspects used in the CASI-F Framework for the Assessment and Management of Sustainable Innovation (see Popper et al., 2017) and twenty (20) fully-fledged evaluation criteria used in the (“old but gold”) MIOIR‘s Evaluating Foresight study (Popper et al., 2010).

Relevant reports

 

Horizon scanning: why and how to launch it in Lithuania?

February 22, 2018 Leave a comment

Lithuania-HIF-cover

The Healthcare Innovation Forum in Vilnius (Lithuania) provides an excellent opportunity to share how VTT‘s Lighthouses research and innovation activities can help to promote ‘Good Life’ in Finland and the World through ‘citizen-centric care’ solutions. In the panel discussion and short keynote I showcased good practices, as well as recent experiences and lessons learned from the UK Horizon Scanning on Healthcare. To download the slides please click here  

Lithuania-HIF_poster.

The first panel debate at the LAWG’s Healthcare Innovation Forum 2018 on “Horizon scanning: why & how to launch it in Lithuania?” featured the following speakers:

  • Dr. Alvydas Česas, Chief of Oncology & Chemotherapy Clinic at Klaipeda University Hospital. Dr. Česas is a certified physician and medical oncologist with over 20 yrs of experience in the field of oncology. He is also the President of Lithuanian Society for Medical Oncology.
  • Per Troein from VP Strategic Partners, IQVIA, UK. Mr. Troein has been with QI for 19 years and is responsible for the relationship with suppliers and associations. He has deep insight around pharmaceutical pricing and how this issue is handled in different markets.
  • Prof. Dr. Rafael Popper from VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Finland/Venezuela/UK. His main areas of work include: ‘foresight’ as an instrument of innovation policy, the development of foresight and horizon scanning methodology, the design of forward-looking activities and their evaluation with a focus on technological and social innovation policies, and the assessment and management of sustainable innovations.

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To see the full programme, please click here.

PS. In case you don’t know where Vilnius is, you may find the following controvertial and cheeky, yet impactful, campaign/news interesting 😉

Vinius-G-spot-of-Europe

Foresight and the future of science

January 18, 2018 Leave a comment
Popper_2018_Foresigh-and-the-future-of-science

Keynote at the 275th Anniversary Symposium of the 
Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

Abstract

Foresight has emerged as a key instrument for the development and implementation of research and innovation policy. Foresight is a systematic, participatory, prospective and policy-oriented process which, with the support of environmental/horizon scanning approaches, is aimed to actively engage key stakeholders into a wide range of activities anticipating, recommending and transforming (ART) technological, economic, environmental, political, social and ethical (TEEPSE) futures.

In Georghiou et al. (2008) Foresight is characterised by long-term orientation, use of a range of formal tools and techniques for long-term analyses, involvement of a wide pool of expertise and stakeholders and crossing disciplinary boundaries and professional compartments. Five non-exclusive generations of foresight have influenced practices over the last decades: 1st Generation (focused on dynamics of technology), 2nd Generation (focused on technology and markets), 3rd Generation (focused on technology and markets + social dimension), 4th Generation (focused on distributed role in the STI system) and 5th Generation (focused combined with other strategic fora).

Overall, there are top five rationales to argue the case for, and inform the design and use of, foresight: directing or prioritising investment in STI; building new networks & linkages around a common vision; extending the breadth of knowledge and visions of the future; bringing new actors into the strategic debate; and improving policy-making and strategy formation. This presentation illustrates through five cases (Irish Technology Futures; Media Weak Signals; VTT Lighthouses; CASI-F; and VERA case) how these rationales have shaped foresight and the future of science.

See PDF slides: Popper_2018_Keynote-on-Foresight-and-the-future-of-science

2017 Executive Course on Foresight and Horizon Scanning

February 8, 2017 Leave a comment

mioir_the_art_of_foresight_horizon_scanningThe ART of Foresight & Horizon Scanning: Anticipating, Recommending and Transforming Research and Innovation Futures

The world is experiencing great uncertainties about the unfolding economic crisis and its aftershocks. Many countries, industries and public services face challenging futures where the quest for opportunities is increasingly competitive. Economic discontent has combined with existing political stresses to catch many institutions – and countries – wrong-footed. Meanwhile, globalisation, migration, environmental, political and technological trends are reshaping the rules of the game. This calls for critical reflections on existing assumptions, plans and strategies for the long-term future.

Our foresight course explores ways in which decision-makers can address uncertainties. How to produce sound and forward looking results that are useful for decision-makers?

The Institute’s course on Foresight and Horizon Scanning has been running annually since 1999, exploring ways in which foresight may be used to help decision-makers and researchers.

Course date: 26-30 June 2017

Areas covered by the course include:

  • How can we proactively design and construct shared visions and success scenarios for societal groups and organisations?
  • What are the threats for which we should be building resilience?
  • What are the opportunities we should be taking advantage of in the future?
  • Why do we need to be systematic and strategic while planning and managing foresight and horizon scanning activities?
  • How do we act upon and evaluate the results of future-oriented work? How do you establish the optimal time horizon of an exercise?

The course is mostly delivered by Institute staff with contributions from external guest speakers, and provides an intensive and practice-orientated learning experience.

The course also offers core lectures on the rationales, processes and fundamentals of foresight and horizon scanning, as well as ways of managing, monitoring and evaluating such activities.

Course Overview

  • Next date: 26-30 June 2017
  • Delivered by: Senior staff and invited external experts
  • Teaching: Lectures, interactive group exercises, case studies, mini-projects
  • Location: Alliance Manchester Business School
  • View our brochure for more details

Registration

Full residential fee: £2,200 per person.
Fee includes – all course materials, accommodation for five nights (pre-booked as standard from, and including, Sunday prior to the start of the course, departing Friday last day of course) and all meals. (Telephone calls, newspapers and drinks at the bar are excluded, though internet access will be available free of charge during course hours).
Non-residential fees can be negotiated on application. Applications are transferable to another individual at any time. Otherwise the cancellation charges will apply as set out below.

Application and payment:

Discount for early booking

  • Foresight Course – before 7 April 2017

CASI Conference Exploring Policy Options for Responsible Research, Sustainability and Innovation

November 16, 2016 Leave a comment

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION FOR RESEARCH, PRACTICE AND POLICY

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CASI Conference 2016

The CASI policy conference focused on best public participation and sustainable innovation practices and identified common European priorities on how to stimulate societal participation for sustainable innovation activities in European regions, scientific institutions, SMEs and other societal actors. We brought together a broad range of experts, stakeholders, policy-makers, entrepreneurs, regional authorities and Commission officials. The CASI conference focused on the intersection of public participation and sustainable innovation.

In the first half of the CASI project and based on key lessons learned from the assessment of 500+ SI initiatives, a research team from The University of Manchester developed the following preliminary definition of sustainable innovation (SI):

  • Sustainable innovation is ‘any incremental or radical change in the social, service, product, governance, organisational, system or marketing landscape that leads to positive environmental, economic and social transformation without compromising the needs, welfare and wellbeing of current and future generations’.
    • Source:  Popper et al. (2016) Sustainable Innovation Conceptual Framework.

However, as the project evolved with new lessons learned from management actions and roadmaps linked to 40+ sustainable innovation pilot studies, The University of Manchester felt the need to take a more systemic approach, which helped the CASI project move towards a final definition:

  • Sustainable innovation is ‘any incremental or radical change in a socio-technical system leading to positive environmental, economic and social transformations without compromising the needs, welfare and wellbeing of current and future generations’.
    • Source:  Popper, R., Velasco, G., Popper, M. (2017) CASI-F: Common Framework for the Assessment and Management of Sustainable Innovation, CASI project report, Deliverable 6.2.
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CASI-F

The conference included several sessions, including one on ‘Assessing and Managing Sustainable Innovation: The CASI-F‘.

Session Chairs: Victor van Rij and Rafael Popper

  • Public engagement – the holistic approach of the CASI project.
    • Zoya Damianova, ARC Fund
  • What is sustainable innovation?  The CASI experience – public engagement for sustainable innovation.
    • Rafael Popper and Guillermo Velasco, University of Manchester
  • How to assess and manage Sustainable Innovation? 
    • Rafael Popper and Guillermo Velasco, University of Manchester
  • Introduction to the Training Course on Applying CASI-F.
    • Rafael Popper and Guillermo Velasco, University of Manchester
  • Discussion

Join and enjoy our 2016 Course on Foresight and Horizon Scanning

June 8, 2016 Leave a comment

foresight-course-2016Anticipating, Recommending and Transforming Research and Innovation Futures

The world is experiencing great uncertainties about the unfolding economic crisis and its aftershocks. Many countries, industries and public services face challenging futures where the quest for opportunities is increasingly competitive. Economic discontent has combined with existing political stresses to catch many institutions – and countries – wrong-footed. Meanwhile, globalisation, migration, environmental, political and technological trends are reshaping the rules of the game. This calls for critical reflections on existing assumptions, plans and strategies for the long-term future.

Our foresight course explores ways in which decision-makers can address uncertainties. How to produce sound and forward looking results that are useful for decision-makers?

Areas covered by the course include:

  • How can we proactively design and construct shared visions and success scenarios for societal groups and organisations?
  • What are the threats for which we should be building resilience?
  • What are the opportunities we should be taking advantage of in the future?
  • Why do we need to be systematic and strategic while planning and managing foresight and horizon scanning activities?
  • How do we act upon and evaluate the results of future-oriented work? How do you establish the optimal time horizon of an exercise?

The course is mostly delivered by Institute staff with contributions from external guest speakers, and provides an intensive and practice-orientated learning experience.

The course also offers core lectures on the rationales, processes and fundamentals of foresight and horizon scanning, as well as ways of managing, monitoring and evaluating such activities.

Course Overview
  • Next date: 27th June – 1 July 2016
  • Delivered by: Senior staff and invited external experts
  • Teaching: Lectures, interactive group exercises, case studies, mini-projects
  • Location: Manchester Business School

For further information on fees and registration please contact lisa.gledhill@mbs.ac.uk