Archive

Posts Tagged ‘social sciences’

CASI Conference Exploring Policy Options for Responsible Research, Sustainability and Innovation

November 16, 2016 Leave a comment

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION FOR RESEARCH, PRACTICE AND POLICY

img_3797_casi-conference

CASI Conference 2016

The CASI policy conference focused on best public participation and sustainable innovation practices and identified common European priorities on how to stimulate societal participation for sustainable innovation activities in European regions, scientific institutions, SMEs and other societal actors. We brought together a broad range of experts, stakeholders, policy-makers, entrepreneurs, regional authorities and Commission officials. The CASI conference focused on the intersection of public participation and sustainable innovation.

In the first half of the CASI project and based on key lessons learned from the assessment of 500+ SI initiatives, a research team from The University of Manchester developed the following preliminary definition of sustainable innovation (SI):

  • Sustainable innovation is ‘any incremental or radical change in the social, service, product, governance, organisational, system or marketing landscape that leads to positive environmental, economic and social transformation without compromising the needs, welfare and wellbeing of current and future generations’.
    • Source:  Popper et al. (2016) Sustainable Innovation Conceptual Framework.

However, as the project evolved with new lessons learned from management actions and roadmaps linked to 40+ sustainable innovation pilot studies, The University of Manchester felt the need to take a more systemic approach, which helped the CASI project move towards a final definition:

  • Sustainable innovation is ‘any incremental or radical change in a socio-technical system leading to positive environmental, economic and social transformations without compromising the needs, welfare and wellbeing of current and future generations’.
    • Source:  Popper, R., Velasco, G., Popper, M. (2017) CASI-F: Common Framework for the Assessment and Management of Sustainable Innovation, CASI project report, Deliverable 6.2.
casi-f_2017

CASI-F

The conference included several sessions, including one on ‘Assessing and Managing Sustainable Innovation: The CASI-F‘.

Session Chairs: Victor van Rij and Rafael Popper

  • Public engagement – the holistic approach of the CASI project.
    • Zoya Damianova, ARC Fund
  • What is sustainable innovation?  The CASI experience – public engagement for sustainable innovation.
    • Rafael Popper and Guillermo Velasco, University of Manchester
  • How to assess and manage Sustainable Innovation? 
    • Rafael Popper and Guillermo Velasco, University of Manchester
  • Introduction to the Training Course on Applying CASI-F.
    • Rafael Popper and Guillermo Velasco, University of Manchester
  • Discussion

EULAKS Policy Workshop at London School of Economics (LSE)

September 23, 2010 Comments off
  • Chair of expert panel on Utilisation of SSH research results for public policy design – The European versus the Latin American experience.
  • Discussant of expert panel on Different dimensions of knowledge society capacity building in Latin America.

As its final event EULAKS project held a policy workshop on September 23-24, 2010 at the London School of Economics (LSE). In the framework of the workshop main results of the analytical work packages of the project were presented to policymakers and targeted groups of stakeholders. The analytical tasks include a review on trends and patterns in the Europe-Latin America co-operation in the Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH), an analysis of the role of SSH for Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) policy design and implementation, and an analysis of scientific communities and research networks in both regions. Upon the research results policy recommendations for future policies were discussed during the workshop with the aim to support future SSH co-operation between Europe and Latin America. The discussions were enriched by keynotes from international experts on the utilisation of SSH research results for public policy design.

For further information, please visit: http://www.eulaks.eu/policyworkshop.html

For the agenda, please click here

Mapping Foresight

November 5, 2009 Comments off
Mapping Foresight
Mapping Foresight (2009)

The “Mapping Foresight” report is part of a series of publications produced by the European Foresight Monitoring Network (EFMN project, 2004-2008). The mapping activity was one of the main activities of the network. Over 2000 initiatives were mapped between 2004 and 2008 in Europe and other world regions, including Latin America, North America, Asia and Oceania. The report is the result of the first large international effort aimed at understanding the nature of foresight practices. Foresight has become more than just a tool to support policy or strategy development in Science, Technology, and Innovation (STI). Foresight practice is the result of a systematic work to promote effective processes to proactively think about the future. These processes can be applied to a variety of research areas or knowledge domains, such as natural sciences, medical sciences, engineering and technology, agricultural sciences, social sciences, and the humanities.

Click here to read more.

Speaking at the International Conference on the Future of SSH (Brussels)

October 22, 2009 Comments off

International Conference on the Future of Social Sciences and Humanities

The future of the Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) depends on their ability better to meet the needs of societies. To reach society, the economy and the political system, good interaction is required between the different intellectual communities, an interaction that overcomes traditional feuds between schools and disciplines. The first session presents and discusses the results of the SSH Futures project, a study about the future of the Social Sciences and Humanities in Europe.

The role of SSH in futures research

The role of SSH in futures research

In this conference I was invited to talk about What is the role of social sciences and humanities in futures (SSH) research?

To do so, in my presentation I used 841 cases to look at the role of the SSH in futures research. In Section 1 (Is futures research a fashion?), the study sets the context and argues that foresight is not mere fashion, thus showing that today’s futures research is increasingly becoming a key and systematic instrument for the development and implementation of research and innovation policy.

Section 2 (How to map interdisciplinarity in futures research?) provides a brief introduction to the Mapping Foresight activities carried out by the EU- funded European Foresight Monitoring Network (now European Foresight Platform – EFP). This section describes how the six areas of the Frascati taxonomy (engineering and technology, natural sciences, medical sciences, agricultural sciences, social sciences and humanities) were used to indentify (a) key areas of inter- and transdisciplinary research in Europe and (b) key areas of specialization even within the disciplines.

Section 3 (What is the role of SSH in futures research?) shows the interconnection and interdependency of SSH with other main areas and 62 sub-areas of the Frascati taxonomy. This section reveals, for example, that Engineering and Technology, Social Sciences and Natural Sciences are by far the most popular categories characterizing futures work. The results of the analyses show similar interdependency patterns between Engineering and Technology and Social Sciences. Another (hardly surprising) finding is the low proportion of Engineering and Technology studies interconnected with areas of Humanities (5%). However, it was indeed rather unexpected to find that 65% of the Humanities studies are linked to Engineering and Technology areas. At an aggregated level, these results expose the existence of uneven or asymmetric interconnections between research areas. However, at the lower levels, it is possible to identify sub-areas that might well be considered ‘knowledge junctions’ between SSH and other areas. The analysis suggests, for instance, that there are two equally important sub-areas linking the Engineering and Technology and Social Sciences areas, namely: Environmental Engineering and Communications Technologies. Although the importance of these linkages may be obvious for some, their recognition as fundamental ‘knowledge junctions’ in the relationship between Engineering and Technology and Social Sciences is a significant result of the mapping.

Section 4 (Final remarks and recommendations for the future of SSH) argues that social sciences is the ‘binder’ of all research topics in the foresight exercises. Except for Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences and Law, Justice and Law Enforcement, all topics are highly interconnected with other areas of the Frascati taxonomy. In particular, the study highlights the cohesive role of foresight on sub-areas of the Social Sciences. This is mainly because foresight projects are designed in such a way that, at some time in the process, linkages are established with the policy dimension or (using the Frascati terminology) with sub-area Policy and Political Science. This is quite the opposite with research within Humanities, which have the least salient links to other research topics. For this reason, the study recommends (1) promoting futures research on Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences and Law, Justice and Law Enforcement topics; (2) promoting futures research on sub-areas of Humanities, such as journalism, religion or history; (3) involving SSH researchers in activities aimed at informing and shaping foresight practices; and (4) informing SSH researchers, policy-makers and business communities about the role of SSH in futures research (such recognition could increase the profile of SSH; increase the interdisciplinary nature of research, networking and co-operation; and help identify more coherent and bottom-up Grand Challenges by interconnecting knowledge from a wide range of domains).

Click here to see presentation.

Conference on The Future of Social Sciences and Humanities (Brussels, Belgium)

October 22, 2009 Comments off

(Brussels, Belgium) Speaker on the Role of Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) in Futures Research at the Final International Conference of the Future of SSH project (Over 90 participants).

The Future of Social Sciences and Humanities

October 22-23, 2009, Brussels, Belgium

Social Sciences and the Humanities have an important mission in the knowledge society and for evidence-based politics. However, their role is not always appreciated and their inputs are not always effectively used. There are discrepancies between the potential importance of social science knowledge and the comparatively low attention they receive from politics, other scientific fields and the public as a whole. To reach society, the economy and the political system, good interaction is required between the different intellectual communities, an interaction that overcomes traditional feuds between schools and disciplines.

At the final conference of the SSH-FUTURES project commissioned by DG Research in the 6th Framework Programme in Brussels in October a workshop will be held on the topic of ‘The Future of Social Sciences and Humanities’. The conference will be a two-day event held. On the first day, the members of the SSH-FUTURES consortium will present the results of their study and discuss potential recommendations and conclusions. The second day will be devoted to the results of similar projects.